I posted this photo on Flickr yesterday and while doing it thought I should blog about this. I really don’t like to trace patterns.  I am the type of sewer that wants to jump right in, skipping this vital step.  Also, taping a bunch of 8.5 x 11" sheets of copy paper together is a pain in the rear and tissue paper tears so easily.  I’ve tried freezer paper too, but I find it kind of stiff at times.  But, after a few cut pattern fiascoes and those crazy overlaid patterns
in Japanese craft books, I am beginning to realize that I should just
trace every pattern I sew before I cut.  I think I have found a great solution.

Sep_10_001_1_1_2

Enter exam table paper.  You know, like at the doctor’s office.  It comes on a large roll and is a bit heavier than tissue paper, but still see through.  This is what I have been using to trace patterns for about a year now.  This is the only roll I have ever bought – I got mine at the local store that went out of business, but you can buy them at medical supply stores too.  There is still a ton left on the roll so I imagine that I will be using it for a long time to come.  Big bonus too is that it doesn’t take up much storage space and the ends don’t curl up so much when you roll it out.  I generally use pencil or pen, but fine tip felt tip markers work great too – they just glide down the paper.  So there you go:  my tip for the day.

And can I just say how completely blown away I am at the number of comments on yesterday’s book post?  Wow.  I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.  Who doesn’t like free stuff?  If you want your chance at winning a copy, comment on yesterday’s post.  Comments here won’t count and I am cutting them off at 12:00 a.m. EST (New York) Saturday morning, the 13th.

I hope you all enjoy the weekend.  I’m looking forward to some quality time with my sewing machine.  What do you have planned?

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